Congregation Book Study:

Chapter 6, par. 9-15
In paragraph 12 we show that Jehovah doesn’t act precipitously in punishing the wicked, but waits until their sin has become manifest. In the case of the Amorites, it took 400 years for their error to “come to completion”. (Gen. 15:16) We may wonder why Jehovah tolerates wrongdoing for what seems such a long period of time from a human perspective.  It seems that when dealing with groups and peoples and institutions and organizations, many decades, even centuries, must transpire before the sin reaches its completion and is readily manifest to all.

Theocratic Ministry School

Bible Reading: Exodus 19-22
The Israelites enter into the covenant with God. They are to become a “kingdom of priests and a holy nation.” (Ex. 19:6)  Alas, they break their side of the agreement, but on the bright side, this opened the way for the rest of us to have a share.

Moses takes the word of the people to Jehovah. Notice Jehovah’s response:  “I am going to come to you in a dense cloud, so that the people may hear when I speak with you and so that they will always believe in you.” (Ex. 19:9 NET Bible) Our version renders this, “that they may always put faith in you”. This is how Jehovah validates those in whom he has invested his spirit and through whom he speaks. Moses was Jehovah’s appointed channel of communication and there would have been no doubt of that fact after such a powerful visual manifestation. Today, Jesus is Jehovah’s channel of communication as is the written word of God found in the Bible. No man or group of men can lay claim to authority paralleling that invested in Moses, because no man or group of men have been visibly endorsed by God as Moses was. To state otherwise and demand that all accept this is to act presumptuously.

Jehovah doesn’t take kindly to presumptuousness, but as we have seen above, he is patient and long-suffering, because he does not wish any to be destroyed. (2 Peter 3:9)

Theocratic Ministry School Review

 

Service Meeting

5 min: Start a Bible Study on the First Saturday

 

15 min: “Exciting Design for New Tracts!”
I find it very hard to get excited by things like a redesigned printing format.  I have been to company sales seminars where middle management tries to hype up the sales force with the latest campaign innovation from the marketing department.  I am increasing feeling like a salesman rather than a preacher of the good news. I agree that the printed word is a powerful tool to spread the message, but don’t you find the hype to be off-putting? Maybe it’s just me, but I like to think that the true faith should be different from corporate religion, and indeed it is.

10 min: “New Video for Starting Bible Studies.”
This is an excellent video, professionally crafted. Whether or not people will stand at the door for five minutes to watch it is another thing. It reminds me somewhat of the era when we went to the door with a portable phonograph and played sermons by Judge Rutherford.  However, people were far more patient back then and a portable phonograph was cutting-edge cool.  Still, there is nothing wrong with the content of the video save that it points the householder to Jehovah’s Witnesses which means that instead of drawing them toward submission to Christ, they may be drawn into submission to men.

Isn’t it amazing how quickly the jw.org web site has gone from obscurity to the center of all our preaching activity? True, we came to the party a bit late, but we are making up for the time lost with our customary zeal.

It seems every major religion in Christendom has jumped on the “dot org” bandwagon. All you have to do is type in a religion’s name, append “.org” and you’ll get a web site like ours. Some examples:

uuc.org
baptist.org
catholic.org
mormon.org
christadelphia.org
rcg.org

Can there be any doubt but that we are part of organized religion? Still, there are good men at all levels of the corporation trying to preach the good news. Sincere individuals who still have a positive influence, and some of the articles release prove that, I believe. But I fear their voices are being slowly stifled.